Novel writing

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Controlling the appearance of chapter titles is another one of those situations where it seems Scrivener expects you to make too many decisions. If fact, the defaults are set up so that you need make no decisions at all - unless you want to do something different. In the blog post Structuring in Scrivener: Chapter titles and numbering, I explained how the automatic numbering works - if you want Scrivener to...

Chapter titles and numbering! Because Scrivener offers so much flexibility and gives you so many options to choose between, sometimes you may feel overwhelmed by it all. My advice is to leave the defaults as they are and, only if you feel the need to change something, should you start to explore what options are open to you. So, let's explore today's topic: Chapter titles and numbering ...

Recently, I was interviewed by Wayne and Leah of JoinedUp Writing for their podcast series and one of the topics we discussed is how Scrivener can be used from blank page to published manuscript. From blank page to published manuscript: the commissioned route If you are commissioned to write a book, the publisher employs an editor and a proofreader and a typesetter and a cover designer, etc and 'all' you do is...

Welcome Patsy Collins! My nag buddy, Patsy, is no stranger to RedPenners, and she has been my guest on this blog before, back in April 2016. As I'm currently focusing on formatting, I asked Patsy to share her thoughts on this topic, particularly as she's just published a new collection of short stories: No Family Secrets. Don't you just love the cover? Inside are 25 stories dedicated to her 10 cousins. Have you noticed...

Today's the day - NaNoWriMo starts at midnight! Before that? A Simply Scrivener Special! The Simply Scrivener Special webinars will continue throughout November. There's one TODAY at noon. Click here to register your place. What we talk about depends on who comes and what questions are included on the questionnaire. Click here to complete yours. Then? For the month of November, my focus will be on writing that novel. So as not to bore those Scrivener...

The secret of winning NANO – going through that 50K barrier before time runs out on day 30 – boils down to setting targets and achieving your goals . The NaNoWriMo barchart plots your daily progress Under the Stats tab, you'll see this. Right now, it's showing nothing as we've not started yet. But, during November, each time you enter your word-count-to-date, the stats bar chart tells you how you’re progressing. If you’re...

If you've never tried the split screen option, or have - and got into a pickle - read on.  All is explained! What does the Scrivener screen look like, without a split screen? If you are looking at one scene, and choose Scrivenings view, you'll have the Binder on the left with your selected scene highlighted, the text of your scene in the centre Editing pane, and the Inspector on the right. Notice...

Two weeks to go until we can start writing for real, and it's time to start creating the perfect writing space. The Scrivener workspace The basic workspace can be separated into three panes: The Binder on the left The editing pane with Scrivenings, or Corkboard, or Outliner in the centre The Inspector on the right Closing the Inspector pane The Inspector pane can be closed (and reopened) by clicking on the Inspector icon. You could...

Project keywords provide another way of recording metadata. As a reminder: I've renamed Label as Location - so I know where each scene takes place. I've not changed Status - it will prove useful when I start to edit. I've set up custom metadata for POV - see the blog post on 16 October. Now, I'm going to use project keywords to record who appears within each scene, and then consider other...

The Label and Status options within the Inspector are valuable for metadata, but if you need more, you'll need to set up custom metadata. I've used Label for Location and am keeping Status for the progress of any scene. As well as this, I want to keep track of who has the POV (point of view) in each scene as well as who is present in each scene, and to access this data...