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Document titles serve many purposes. Document titles act as labels in the Binder for your text documents. They can be revealed in Scrivenings, providing a reminder as to what you intended as an outline. Document titles can become section headings in your exported manuscript. Use them to good effect! Labels in the Binder Although the document titles appear in the binder, and that's where the structure of your document is most apparent, you can also...

Controlling the appearance of chapter titles is another one of those situations where it seems Scrivener expects you to make too many decisions. If fact, the defaults are set up so that you need make no decisions at all - unless you want to do something different. In the blog post Structuring in Scrivener: Chapter titles and numbering, I explained how the automatic numbering works - if you want Scrivener to...

Chapter titles and numbering! Because Scrivener offers so much flexibility and gives you so many options to choose between, sometimes you may feel overwhelmed by it all. My advice is to leave the defaults as they are and, only if you feel the need to change something, should you start to explore what options are open to you. So, let's explore today's topic: Chapter titles and numbering ...

Today's guest is Karl Melby. A fellow member of Self-Publishing School, Karl is the author of the mouth-watering book: A Million Ways to Make Vanilla Ice Cream. Like me, Karl uses Scrivener. Why? Scrivener has turned my life around. I now have all my ideas collected in one place, in an easily accessible way. In just one separate Scrivener project file, all my ideas are noted. I have my categories, as chapters in a...

Structuring in Scrivener is all about creating folders and documents, and determining the formatting levels of each component of your manuscript. Levels are important when you Compile - your decisions on formatting for the page apply to one level at a time. What are formatting levels? Within the binder, entries are indented to indicate different levels within the structure of your manuscript. Anything flush to the left is Level 1; anything indented from...

Structuring in Scrivener is all about creating folders and documents and essential to this is understanding the binder icons. What do the icons tell you? Icons serve to give a quick indication of the content: Folder or text document? Whether or not there's a synopsis Whether or not you've taken a snapshot Whether more folders/documents are contained within In this one Scrivener project, I've set up examples of every type. I'll talk through these...

Amazon best-seller writer, Kay Kukoyi, was my guest in January 2017. Since then, a lot has happened! Both of Kay’s first two books have become Amazon #1 best-sellers in multiple countries. Don't Hire a Software Developer Until You Read this Book has been #1 in six countries: the UK, US, Germany, Brazil, Australia and Canada. And, Develop Your Idea! reached #1 in four countries. Congratulations Kay! So, how does Scrivener fit whilst working...

My guest today is Rosemary Kind. Rosemary Kind set up the short story download site Alfie Dog Fiction, providing an opportunity for authors to submit their work for publication, and for readers to enjoy an affordable short story online. There are also a number of short story collections, published by Alfie Dog Fiction. This month the site celebrates its fifth birthday and has lots of special offers. How did I meet Rosemary...

In this next series of posts, I'm focusing on how to use folders and documents within Scrivener to create a meaningful structure for a writing project. Although my initial reason for using Scrivener was for writing novels for NaNoWriMo - and we will look at how structure works in fiction in subsequent posts - I now use Scrivener for all my writing projects. So I'm starting with my most recent 'use' of folders -...

If you've never considered using Scrivener for writing your blog post, think again! Scrivener is not just for novel writing; I use Scrivener for EVERYTHING, especially for my blog and social media engagement. Here are my 5 top reasons why. 1: All in one place I have just one file for each writing project. Neat. Tidy. There's one for my RedPen book: EDITING The RedPen Way: 10 steps to successful self-editing - and one for each of the three...