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The next 8 weeks will fly by, so - if you are keen to use Scrivener for NANO 2016 - now is the time to start learning how. What is NANO? NANO, short of NaNoWriMo, is the  National Novel Writers Month. Writers all over the world spend the 30 days of November writing the first 50K words of their novel. The NaNoWriMo website opens its doors in October and then the fun starts....

I've not posted in a while, but I have a great excuse: I've been busy compiling with Scrivener and now have three versions of the same manuscript: EDITING The RedPen Way. I've learnt much much more about the power of Scrivener in the past three weeks, but the best bit (there are so many best bits!) is the flexibility of output. I explain below why I had three different forms of output, and I'll...

This week, I’ve been focusing on Scrivener Links. On Tuesday, I explained how to create Scrivener Links that allow a reader to jump from one part of my ebook or Kindle version to another. On Thursday, the focus was on Scrivener Links that take the reader to a website. This posting tackles how to set up the links within the table of contents (TOC). Table of Contents (TOC) All books need a table...

This week, I’m focusing on Scrivener Links. On Tuesday, I explained how to create Scrivener Links that allow a reader to jump from one part of my ebook or Kindle version to another. Today, the focus is on Scrivener Links that take the reader to a website. The next posting will then tackle how to set up the links within the table of contents (TOC). P If you have any questions...

This week I'm focusing on Scrivener Links: Links that allow a reader to jump from one part of my ebook or Kindle version to another That takes the reader to a website Links within the table of contents (TOC) Let's start with the simplest. Part 1 of 3 Scrivener Links within a manuscript In my EDITING the RedPen Way, I have a section towards the end which offers tips for using digital techniques to...

Manuscript preparations You can click on the Compile option any time you are curious to see what the 'finished' product will look like. It makes sense though, to make sure your manuscript is as good as it can be, and 'clean' enough to export. What's a 'clean' manuscript? By clean, I mean no typographical errors, typos for short: wrong spellings, missing or misplaced punctuation ...

Yesterday, I took a quick walk through the first six of the Compilation Options: Contents, Separators, Cover, Formatting, Title Adjustments, and Layout. Compilation options, Part 2 Today, I am looking at the other seven. There's nothing too exciting - or scary - but, before we start studying compiling options in detail, it's worth noting what these cover. Tomorrow, I'll explain what to do to your manuscript before you select Compile for the first...

I won't pretend that the Compile feature is simple; it's incredibly complicated. That's the 'bad' news. Compilation options, Part 1 What's the good news? The good news is that most settings are already as you might want them, so you only need to fine-tune them. And, the complexity level simply means it's incredibly powerful. There are 13 (unlucky for some?) sections (called tabs) in the Compilation Options list. What follows is a quick walk through...

One of the marvelous features of Scrivener is the Compile option. Having just finished my latest book, I've been experimenting with compiling for the past fortnight and now I'm ready to share with you all that I've gleaned. Brace yourselves! What custom format will you choose? Having written your manuscript, it's easy to export and there are numerous formats available. Whichever you choose, first, set up a Custom Format. Setting up a custom format Select Compile...

In less than an hour, I'll be hosting another Simply Scrivener Special webinar. What's on the Simply Scrivener Special agenda? As well as whatever questions you ask, I'm keen to tell you about a Scrivener Guide, available free, all about compiling - and formatting. I'm near to completing a book - all about Red Pen Editing. I've used Scrivener, of course, for the writing - and I've been learning loads about compiling. My plan was to...