Blog posts

Home > Blog posts (Page 15)

Setting targets The secret of winning NANO – going through that 50K barrier before time runs out on day 30 – boils down to setting targets and achieving your goals. The NaNoWriMo barchart plots your daily progress Under the Stats tab, you'll see this. Right now, it's showing nothing as we've not started yet. But, during November, each time you enter your word-count-to-date, the stats bar chart tells you how you’re progressing. If you’re...

Never tried the split screen option? Or have - and got into a pickle - read on.  All is explained! What does the Scrivener screen look like, without a split screen? If you are looking at one scene, and choose Scrivenings view, you'll have the Binder on the left with your selected scene highlighted, the text of your scene in the centre Editing pane, and the Inspector on the right. Notice the icon in...

Rachel Hobbs, Today’s guest. Rachel is the author of e-books Bite-Sized Fiction For Busy People and up-and-coming Tall Tales For Humdrum Days. During the day, Rachel works as a full-time dental nurse at a small local practice in a little Welsh village in South West Wales. In her spare time, Rachel writes, and she uses Scrivener! Before Scrivener, Rachel, what did you use? Before I stumbled across Scrivener, I used Word. There’s nothing wrong with Word;...

Two weeks to go until we can start writing for real, and it's time to start creating the perfect writing space. The Scrivener workspace The basic workspace can be separated into three panes: The Binder on the left The editing pane with Scrivenings, or Corkboard, or Outliner in the centre The Inspector on the right Closing the Inspector pane The Inspector pane can be closed (and reopened) by clicking on the Inspector icon. You could then...

One of the most powerful features in Scrivener is the option to use the corkboard to outline your story. The structure of a novel A novel is essentially one scene after another. These scenes can be grouped into chapters and, if you want, you can group the chapters into parts. Recall that you can opt to set up a novel with parts using the Scrivener project templates. My LOL: Left Over Lovers doesn't have parts - I'm...

In the same way, as a scriptwriter sets the scene for a play or a film, a novelist needs to invent the world for the cast of characters to inhabit. The choice for each set within the world of your novel is entirely yours. You could stick close to home using familiar locations. Distant lands could give you the excuse to travel for research purposes. Or, you could create invent a world set in...